Other Resources

Descriptions and resources available below are:

. ICDE Quality Network online guides

. JUTLP special CADAD issue (2016)

. Development of Academics and Higher Education Futures (DAHEF)

. GCTE: A national Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Education

. Preparing Academics to Teach in Higher Education (PATHE) project

. Teaching Large Classes

. University Teacher Preparation Program (TPP)

. Sessional Teaching

. RED: Recognition – Enhancement – Development

. Coordinators Leading Advancement of Sessional Staff (CLASS) Project

. Strategic Leadership for Institutional Teaching and Learning Centres

. e-Teaching Leadership: planning and implementing a benefits-oriented costs model

 


International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE) Quality Network

Recent publications (published over the last three years) emanating from Oceania on guidelines for quality in online, open and flexible education

3 April 2017

Prepared by Assoc Prof Philip Uys (Lead Contact for ICDE Focal Point on Quality – Oceania) with assistance from Kate Rose (both from Charles Sturt University, Australia)

  1. Through a focus on enhancing the effectiveness of tertiary teaching and learning practices, Ako Aotearoa will assist educators and organisations to enable the best possible educational outcomes for all learners.
    1. Date – 2014
  • URLhttp://www.elg.ac.nz/
  • Abstract – The eLearning guidelines (eLg) have been developed to assist the tertiary sector in its engagement with eLearning. The guidelines offer prompts for reflection from five perspectives – the learner, teacher, manager, organisational leader and quality assurance body.  When considering one of these perspectives in the eLearning and eTeaching process, the guidelines assist the designing, implementing and enhancing of your practice to ensure thoughtful and intentional eLearning provision.
  1. The Australasian Council on Open, Distance and e-Learning (ACODE) is the peak Australasian organisation for universities engaged or interested in technology enhanced learning and teaching
    1. Title – ACODE Benchmarks for Technology Enhanced Learning

in their practice of delivering a quality technology enhanced learning experience for their students and staff (recognising that some institutions refer to their practice with terms such as e-learning, online or flexible learning, blended, etc.). There are eight benchmarks, each of which can be used as a standalone indicator, or used collectively to provide a whole of institution perspective.

  1. The Connected Learning Advisory – Te Ara Whītiki provides free, consistent, unbiased advice on integrating digital technologies with learning for all state-funded schools and kura in New Zealand. This service will help schools and kura make the most of the connections that digital technologies provide so they can get the best results for their students and school community. NZ government – Ministry of Education
    1. Titlee-Learning Planning Framework
  1. The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) is Australia’s independent national regulator of the higher education sector. The new Higher Education Standards Framework (Threshold Standards) 2015(HES Framework) applies from 1 January 2017.
    1. Title – Guidance Note: Technology-Enhanced Learning
      • Date – 2016
      • URL – http://www.teqsa.gov.au/sites/default/files/GuidanceNote_Technology-EnhancedLearning1.0.pdf
      • Abstract – Higher education is delivered in many ways, including through the use of a diversity of technologies such as multimedia, video and online conferencing tools, podcasting, chat rooms, and dedicated learning management systems. Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) is a generic term for modes of course delivery that include such elements, and their use is sometimes also referred to as ‘e-learning’

TEL is not a term used in the Higher Education Standards Framework (Threshold Standards) 2015 (HES Framework), but in this context it is interpreted broadly as any learning that occurs through the application of electronic communications and computer-based educational technology, combined with pedagogical principles and practices that are applicable to and tailored for this purpose. This might range from augmenting face-to-face teaching with TEL in a limited way, through ‘blended delivery’ (with a more equal mix of the two) to fully ‘online’ delivery.

  1. The Open Education Licensing Project was a joint research and development project undertaken by Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Tasmania in 2015/16. In 2015 the project team surveyed and collected information from managers, educators and information professionals in Australian universities about their understanding and experiences with licensing issues for open online education. In 2016 the team developed the OEL Toolkit to support the use and development of Open Educational Resources (OER) in the Australian higher education sector.
  1. Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE) is an incorporated not-for-profit professional association for those engaged in the educational use of technologies in tertiary education. The 2013 conference hosted by Macquarie University hoped to cast our minds towards the future through the conference theme, ‘Electric Dreams’.
    1. Title – Using the e-learning Maturity Model to Identify Good Practice in E-Learning
  • Author – Stephen Marshall
  • Date – 2013
  • URL – http://www.ascilite.org/conferences/sydney13/program/papers/Marshall.pdf
  • Abstract – E-learning is a complex endeavor which presents significant challenges as the scale and complexity of different technologies and pedagogical models grows. The e-learning Maturity Model is a quality framework aimed at helping educational institutions engage with this complexity both by understanding the state of their current organizational e-learning capability, but also by providing tools aimed at systematically improving that capability. The eMM framework includes an extensive body of information drawn from the literature but is also intended to help identify useful examples from different institutions so these can inform other organization seeking ideas for their own situation. This paper describes a number of such examples of good practice identified as part of an ongoing project applying the eMM to Australian universities, and signals the potential outcomes possible from a more complete sample in the future.
  1. Charles Sturt University, Australia
    1. Title – CSU Online Learning & Teaching Model
      • URL – https://www.csu.edu.au/uimagine/online-learning-model
      • Abstract – The Online Learning Model consists of a set of elements designed to increase student engagement, retention and overall satisfaction. The model builds on Moore’s (1989) model which incorporates learner-teacher, learner-learner and learner-content interaction. The model broadens Moore’s notion of interactivity to one of engagement and adds learner-community engagement as a key component of professional courses, as well as learner-institution engagement to ensure a connected student experience.
  1. University of Tasmania. Australia
    1. Title – Open Educational Practice and Resources
    1. Title – Online (MyLO)
  1. Griffith University – Technology Engaged Learning (TEL) refers to the conscious and planned use of technology in learning and teaching.  Sometimes known as Technology Enhanced Learning or Technology Enabled Learning, in practice TEL is about making use of technology in an engaging and relevant way in your teaching; and enabling your students to the same in their learning. This website provides information on the basics; highlights some technology and tools available; and provides linkages through to support here at Griffith.
    1. Guides, Policies and Good Practice Guides for Blended and Online learning
  1. Federation University, Australia. In the Learning and Teaching Plan 2015-2017 (PDF, 190kb), Professor Marcia Devlin (DVC Learning and Quality) has outlined a strategy to enhance Blended On-Line and Digital (BOLD) Learning across Federation University Australia.
    1. Date – 2015

The BOLD Standards Framework is segregated into four levels from broad good teaching practice principles at level 1, through to specific practice models at level 4,

 Edith Cowan University. Australia

    1. Title – Flexible delivery
  1. James Cook University. Australia
    1. Title – Blended Learning Procedures
  1. University of Queensland. Australia
    1. Title – Examples of flexible delivery
  1. The Council of Australian University Directors of Information Technology (CAUDIT) is an incorporated entity with membership drawn from the Chief Information Officers / IT Directors of higher education institutions in Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea, as well as the Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTG) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS).
    1. TitleHow to set up and run an on-line educational video production service

Related Oceania reports

 Paper by Assoc Prof Gordon Suddaby titled “Flexibility and Quality: Flexible Learning in the National Qualifications Framework” presented at the Malaysian Qualification Agency Conference, Sep 2016.

Abstract – The issue of flexibility in a National Qualification Framework and the associated challenges of ensuring that there is a broad understanding of what flexibility means and mechanisms to ensure that quality teaching and learning results from flexible delivery are becoming more pronounced as the ubiquity of technology increases and the costs decrease. This paper explores issues associated with the increase in flexible options, models that are available to assure quality and some thoughts about the place of flexible learning within a national qualifications framework..

  1. Office of Learning & Teaching. Dept. Education

Projects funded prior to closure of office

  1. Title – Developing Australian Academics’ Capacity: Supporting the Adoption of Open Educational Practices in Curriculum Design
  1. Title – Standards for Online Education (SOE)
    • Author – Mitch Parsell
    • Date – 2014
    • URL – Final Report Download Document
    • Abstract – https://www.onlinestandards.net/ – The SOE Framework is a tool for assessing teaching standards for online education.  The standards are intended as a supplement to, not a replacement for, general teaching standards. They are focused on issues of salience to online learning and teaching.
  2. Title – Adoption, Use and Management of Open Educational Resources to Enhance Teaching and Learning in Australia

 Australian Government – Dept. of Education and Training

    1. TitleDriving Innovation, Fairness and Excellence in Australian Higher Education

 The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) is an intergovernmental organisation created by Commonwealth Heads of Government to promote the development and sharing of open learning and distance education knowledge, resources and technologies. 

    1. TitleA Baseline Study on Technology-Enabled Learning in the Commonwealth Pacific Island Countries: Report
  • Author – Vaa, Leatuaolevao R
  • Date – 2015
  • URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/1738
  • Abstract – This report presents an overview of the developments related to technology-enabled learning in the nine Commonwealth countries of the Pacific as in June 2015. The author provides in-depth analyses of specific country covering ICT in education policies, specific projects, and integration of technology in different levels of education. It presents a summary view of the status of Commonwealth countries in the Pacific Island region.
    1. Title – COL Review of Flexible Learning at the University of the South Pacific
  • Date – 2015
  • URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/1675
  • Abstract – The University of the South Pacific (USP) requested the Commonwealth of Learning (COL) to lead an international panel to review the efficiency and effectiveness of its flexible learning (FL) education programmes. The panel was invited to review the overall strategic direction and operational effectiveness of FL at USP, the FL programmes and courses, the structures that support FL and the development and delivery of FL and to recommend steps that would deliver the university’s strategy and aspiration to be “internationally recognized as the region’s knowledge hub, and as one of the world’s leading universities in flexible and technology supported learning” (Strategic Plan 2013–2018, p. 20). The panel was tasked with assessing strengths and gaps in existing practices and processes related to the coherence of the FL strategy and with providing the Vice Chancellor and the senior management team (SMT) with recommendations, commendations and affirmations of progress that can contribute to USP’s further development.
    1. TitleOpen Educational Resources and Practices at the University of the South Pacific: Status Report and Future Directions
  • Date – 2016
  • Author – Prasad, Deepak; Bhartu, Dhiraj ; Yusuf, Javed
  • URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/2516
  • Abstract – The University of the South Pacific (USP) requested the Commonwealth of Learning (COL) to lead an international panel to review the efficiency and effectiveness of its flexible learning (FL) education programmes. The panel was invited to review the overall strategic direction and operational effectiveness of FL at USP, the FL programmes and courses, the structures that support FL and the development and delivery of FL and to recommend steps that would deliver the university’s strategy and aspiration to be “internationally recognized as the region’s knowledge hub, and as one of the world’s leading universities in flexible and technology supported learning” (Strategic Plan 2013–2018, p. 20). The panel was tasked with assessing strengths and gaps in existing practices and processes related to the coherence of the FL strategy and with providing the Vice Chancellor and the senior management team (SMT) with recommendations, commendations and affirmations of progress that can contribute to USP’s further development.

JUTLP special CADAD issue

Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice 13(4) 2016 special issue sponsored by CADAD.  http://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol13/iss4/

 


Development of Academics and Higher Education Futures (DAHEF)

Link to Office for Learning and Teaching DAHEF page

The Council of Australian Directors of Academic Development (CADAD) successfully applied to the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (now the Office for Learning and Teaching) for support of a project entitled “The Development of Academics and Higher Education Futures”. The project was designed to evaluate how universities organise for academic development and the strategies employed to develop academics in the light of current and emerging challenges for higher education in Australia. 2009 report from 2007 research.

The project is now complete and following resources are available:

Final Report – Volume 1 PDF [DAHEF_Final_report_2009_vol1_ ]
Data and Analysis – Volume 2 PDF [ DAHEF_Final_report_2009_vol2_ ]
OLT DAHEF webpage

 


GCTE: A national Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Education

Link to Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Education website

The vision of this Australian Learning and Teaching Council (now Office for Learning and Teaching) funded  project was to devise a means of delivering the best possible Graduate Certificate in Tertiary Education for new academic staff, creating viable cohorts, and in creating the number of students in each aspect of the program, through a collaborative GCTE offering across five universities. This aimed to create a vibrant cross-institutional community where the course was shared, and efficiencies made the course viable.

The project is now complete and the following resources are available:

Final report PDF here [GCTE Final Report]

Project update August 2010 [GCTE update]

 


Preparing Academics to Teach in Higher Education (PATHE) project

This project aimed to devise a framework for teacher induction programs that would benefit the sector by promoting a set of shared expectations and understandings about the nature of university learning ad teaching, and locating induction programs in that wider context.

The project is now complete and the following resources are available:

Final Report PDF  [PATHE ALTC_report_final ]
PATHE website

 


Teaching Large Classes

Teaching Large Classes Image

Australian academics are increasingly faced with challenges involved in teaching large classes. Large classes are a common experience for many students, particularly those in Science, Business and Arts disciplines, as well as in first-year courses. In many instances, attempts to deal with these challenges have failed to move beyond the techniques traditionally used in classes with small to moderate enrollments, or have been implemented at the individual rather than the institutional level. Therefore, for various reasons, it seems that research findings on the topic and understandings of what constitutes good practice in large classes are not being taken up by many of the academics who have responsibility for teaching large classes.

This site has resources, Guidelines and Case Studies sections for a variety of information, suggestions and links that may be useful to the large class coordinator or teacher.

 


University Teacher Preparation Program (TPP)

Teacher Preparation Program

This resource contains four self-study modules that provide an introduction to key issues impacting on the preparation and delivery of university teacher preparation programs (UTPPs). Each module provides information, advise, learning activities and discussion questions in a self-paced format.

  • This is recommended for those who:

    – Are new to planning and delivery university teacher preparation programs,
    – Want to refresh their skills for delivering these programs. Elements of the resources can act as conversation starters with more experienced colleagues,
    – Are seeking to reconceptualise their understanding of learning and teaching in contemporary contexts.

     


    Sessional Teaching

    Sessional Teaching Image

    Sessional teaches are defined as any university instructors not in tenured or permanent positions. This may include part-time tutors or demonstrators, postgraduate students or research fellows involved in part-time teaching, external people from industry or professions, clinical tutors, casually employed lecturers or any other teachers regularly employed on a course-by-course basis.

    The resources on this site are intended for a variety of audiences and include:

    – University administrators and managers,
    – Heads of departments and heads of schools,
    – Courses/subject coordinators and supervisors of sessional teachers,
    – Sessional teachers.

    Resources include teaching ideas, guidelines, case studies, a review of the relevant literature, related reports, examples of best practice and links to other practical and helpful sites.

     


    RED: Recognition – Enhancement – Development

    The contribution of sessional teachers to higher education                    

    RED was funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (now the Office for Learning and Teaching). This large-scale study into the recognition, enhancement and development of sessional teaching in higher education builds on the Australian Universities Teaching Committee Report (2003a) Training, Support and Management of Sessional Teaching Staff. The aim of RED was to identify and analyse current national practice and refocus attention on the issues surrounding sessional teaching in the university sector.

    This project is now complete and the following resources are available:

    Final Report June 2008 [ Red report ]
    RED Resource June 2008 [ Red resource ]


    Coordinators Leading Advancement of Sessional Staff (CLASS) Project

    Coordinators Leading the Advancement of Sessional Staff

    The aim of this Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) funded project was to enhance the quality of teaching through the development of leadership capacity of subject co-ordinators, thereby improving capacity for academic leadership and management of the teaching team.

    This project is now complete and the following resources are available:

    Full Project Description [ Subject co-ordinators]
    Final Report [ Class report]

     


    Strategic Leadership for Institutional Teaching and Learning Centres: Developing a Model for the 21st Century

    This Australian Learning and Teaching Council (now the Office for Learning and Teaching) funded project set out to identify common factors to be considered in the effective strategic leadership of central organisational structures to enhance long-term learning and teaching performance and to highlight how these factors are being dealt with contextually in a selection of contemporary university settings in Australian higher education. A strong assumption of this project was that strategic leadership is a major expectation of contemporary teaching and learning centres and that the search for strategic leadership in response to institutional expectations and external forces was leading to significant repositioning of centres across the sector.

    The project aims were to investigate the:

    1. ways in which institutional organisational structures and distrinctive organisational cutlutres were being shaped to lead the enhancement of staff capacity bulding for teaching and learning quality assurance and improvement; and
    2. forms of leadership emerging in organisational Centres for Teaching and Learning and whether or not they were responding to the organisational redesign.

    The project is now complete and the following resources are available:

    Final Report [ Strategic leadership final ]
    A Guide to Support Australian University Teaching and Learning Centres [ Strategic leadership guide]

     


    e-Teaching Leadership: planning and implementing a benefits-oriented costs model for technology enhanced learning

    This project, funded by the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT) found that there is a lack of consistent sector information on real teaching costs in universities. What emerged early was that most Australian universities do not have centralised procedures or guidelines for allocating academic workload which take into account the specific activities associated with online or blended learning. We found a paucity of rigorous documented evidence which can be drawn upon to accurately state or even estimate workload associated with teaching online or in blended learning environments. Nor is a rigorous cost-accounting protocol applied at universities to detail the full cost (including staff time) of e-teaching: few universities apply Activity Based Costing (ABC) methods to accurately reflect real teaching tasks/activities. Unsurprisingly, the study found overload due to e-teaching was a significant factor in staff dissatisfaction. Moreover, staff believed that if they reduced their time on e-teaching, student learning would be seriously diminished. It appears that a new consideration of workloads is needed to accommodate the additional tasks of e-teaching.

    The project set out to achieve four key outcomes that were wholly or partially achieved.

     Project Report [ E-teaching leadership ]